Blog

Restoring a lounge chair – Part 2

Welcome to Part 2 of my lounge chair restoration story. If you read Part 1 you would know that I picked up an old lounge chair at a garage sale and am attempting to breath new life into it... risking complete disaster as I have no idea what I'm doing.

So since part one I have cleaned the chair up with soapy water and a scourer. This particular chair needed it as it was sticky to touch and I'm not sure if it was dirt or old varnish or maybe both! I found that if I rubbed to hard it would seem to scratch the wood but then I followed it up with a quick all-over with a fine sand paper and you can't see any scratches now.

I let it dry completely and painted it with its first coat of marine grade estapol. Why so hard core? Well I wanted to save money and get a protective coating that I could also use on a cool old wooden milk crate boxy thingy that I recently acquired, to save money. And the wooden box is to live outside with plants in it, so needs to last in the wild Australian weather. I'm sure you could use a varnish, wax or oil of your choice but I would recommend a satin or matte finish and not glossy. (Wow I really sounded as though I know what I'm doing in the last sentence. Be warned, I am not an expert! If you are taking notes, crumple up your piece of paper and eat it now!!)

I waited a day for my first coat to dry and then added a second coat. To be honest, it doesn't look loads better than when I started but its much nicer to touch and is smooth and clean. It is also now marine-grade.. whatever that means!!

Next I decided to cover the metal parts of the chair with a thick fabric. This is not normal practise, but I didn't want to upholster the chair properly (using a staple gun and all) as I wanted the cushion covers to be washable and also changeable if they get old or if I change my mind on pattern/colour (which happens often!) I also have no idea how to upholster something. I am making this up as I go along.

My idea was to make the chair look okay from all angels and not have any rusty metal touching my lovely cushions. Sounds simple enough right? Well, I after attempting covering this awkward shape, only able to machine about 30% of it (having to sew the rest onto the chair by hand) I'm not so sure I would do it this way again. It was very fiddly and took hours.. and I still need to sew the cushion covers.

Fingers crossed it will al be worth it in the end! Stay tuned for the third and last instalment.

PS. Can you see our new couch in the background of the pictures? It arrived today and I am over the moon! It's hard to stay focused on restoring a lounge chair when you have a brand new coach to rearrange cushions on!

 

 

Leave a comment